Combinations of reproductive, individual, and weather effects explain torpor patterns among female little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus)

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dc.contributor.advisor Broders, Hugh G. (Hugh Gerard), 1972-
dc.creator Besler, Nicole K.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-01T13:55:16Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-01T13:55:16Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.other QL737 C595 B47 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/27533
dc.description x, 111 leaves : illustrations, map ; 29 cm
dc.description Includes abstract and appendices.
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 62-74).
dc.description.abstract Torpor is a thermoregulatory strategy used by some small mammals to, in part, conserve energy during poor weather conditions and limited food. Some mammalian females may use torpor throughout reproduction, however, there are associated physiological and ecological costs and benefits. Torpor use may vary among individuals and result in different fitness consequences. The objective of my study was to identify and quantify variables that best explain variation in torpor patterns among individual female little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus). I used an information-theoretic approach to rank Bayesian models containing reproductive condition, individual, and weather variables based on their probability of explaining variation in torpor. Precipitation and wind were the most influential predictors of torpor frequency, whereas reproductive condition and individual were the best predictors of torpor duration, depth, and the heterothermy index. These results highlight the importance of including multiple intrinsic and extrinsic variables when evaluating thermoregulatory patterns. en_CA
dc.language.iso en en_CA
dc.publisher Halifax, N.S. : Saint Mary's University
dc.subject.lcc QL737.C595
dc.subject.lcsh Little brown bat -- Physiology
dc.subject.lcsh Little brown bat -- Behavior
dc.subject.lcsh Dormancy (Biology)
dc.subject.lcsh Body temperature -- Regulation
dc.title Combinations of reproductive, individual, and weather effects explain torpor patterns among female little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) en_CA
dc.type Text en_CA
thesis.degree.name Master of Science in Applied Science
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.discipline Biology
thesis.degree.grantor Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.)


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